SHOULD WE TAX SODA AND PIZZA?

 

 

Fresh fruit

I almost always travel with fresh fruit

Here is food I cooked for recent air travel (which I do quite a lot of).  Chicken/spinach/spices/mustard.  I did eat their “wheat” bread on the flight – not ideal, but it added some starch.  Be prepared!

Chicken/spinach/spices/mustard

Chicken/spinach/spices/mustard

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food is much cheaper today for Americans than when my parents were children.  Back then, people ate out very seldom; now, Americans spend almost half of their food dollars outside of the home.  Many “bad” foods are cheaper in part because of government subsidies in the US.

I believe we should tax “bad” foods to lower consumption.  In a similar manner, taxing cigarettes and raising their prices has reduced smoking, especially amongst teens.

A study published today showed that, over time, as milk prices rose, Americans consumed less.  As soda and pizza prices fell, Americans consumed more.

I believe we should tax “bad”  (high in fat, sugar, and/or salt) foods to lower consumption, and also to offset the health care costs they impose on the society.  Taxing cigarettes (raising the price) has reduced smoking, especially amongst teens.

Invest in your future and the health of your family – avoid the soda and fast food as much as possible.

 

Dr John Ellis MD

Board-certified anesthesiologist, with expertise in cardiovascular anesthesia and the implications of obesity and sleep apnea in anesthesia. See vascularanesthesia.com for professional information. Dr. Ellis has used the strategies in here to: (1) lose 120 lbs over 18 months, (2) stop all antihypertensive medicines, and (3) no longer need CPAP treatment for sleep apnea.

2 Comments:

  1. Chicken/spinach/spices/mustard looks Good.

  2. Wall Street Journal says:

    Soft-Drink Sales Drop in Schools, Group Says
    By BETSY MCKAY

    The main trade association representing Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo Inc., and other beverage companies plans to release a report Monday showing that sales of soda and other drinks in U.S. secondary schools have dropped sharply since 2004, in a sign that efforts to improve nutrition in schools are progressing….

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704706304575107850656386536.html?mod=rss_Health

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