Sensible government advice

“drink water instead of sugary drinks like soda, and … avoid fatty foods like pizza, desserts and cheese…”

The latest nutrition guidelines reiterate much advice from previous years: eat less salt and saturated fats, eat more fruits and vegetables and whole grains.

Michael Temchine for The New York Times The latest nutrition guidelines reiterate much advice from previous years: eat less salt and saturated fats, eat more fruits and vegetables and whole grains.

The above is from an article in the NY Times, reporting on new federal dietary recommendations.

They go on to say:

While all of that may seem obvious, given the nation’s obesity problem, it is nonetheless considered major progress for federal regulators who have long skirted the issue, wary of the powerful food lobby.

“They are blunter here than they’ve ever been before, and they deserve credit for that,” said Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition at New York University and a critic of government nutrition guidance. “They said, ‘Eat less!’ I think that’s great, and to avoid oversized portions. That’s the two best things you should do.”

For me, eliminating juice (I drank lots of grapefruit juice, though not much soda) and cheese were keys to sustainable weight loss.  I believe these recommendations are a step in the right direction.

Eating a diet rich in protein, leafy green veggies, and complex carbs (brown rice; sweet potatoes) keeps me satisfied with fewer calories.  The meal in the picture should not be an everyday occurrence for those who wish to lose weight.

Among the 23 recommendations:

  • Limit daily sodium consumption to less than 2300 mg. High-risk groups (e.g., those who are over 50, are black, or who have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney diseases) should consume less than 1500 mg.
  • Restrict the percentage of calories coming from saturated fats to less than 10%.
  • Consume less than 300 mg of dietary cholesterol daily.
  • Replace refined grains with whole grains.
  • Restrict consumption of solid fats and added sugars.
  • Limit alcohol to one drink per day for women and two for men.
  • Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables and more of them.
  • Replace some meat and poultry with seafood.

Dr John Ellis MD

Board-certified anesthesiologist, with expertise in cardiovascular anesthesia and the implications of obesity and sleep apnea in anesthesia. See vascularanesthesia.com for professional information. Dr. Ellis has used the strategies in here to: (1) lose 120 lbs over 18 months, (2) stop all antihypertensive medicines, and (3) no longer need CPAP treatment for sleep apnea.

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