PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

I grew up in NYC, where public transport was the norm.  My dear grandmother, as obese as she was, labored up and down the subway stairs in one of the deepest stations in Manhattan (East Broadway) going to work – I think it was a good thing for her!  Some have said that NYC residents are some of the most fit in the US, given low car ownership.  I myself gained 30 lbs in just a few months after buying my first car; I had stopped walking the hills to and from UVa Hospital in Charlottesville VA, where I was an intern.

Here in Chicago, I am blessed have 4 or 5 bus lines at my doorstep, and a commuter train 2 blocks away. I do have a car (in the shop right now), but I also avail myself of the bus and train.  New software tracks buses by GPS (on computer or cell phone) so you don’t have to freeze on the corner so long!

ChicagoCard

Advantages: “green;” relaxing (can read); makes you walk, hustle, and climb stairs; see the city and people in a new light (I got to walk through the Merchandise Mart on the way to the gym)

Disadvantages: can be slow; not private; crime; smelly folks; not temperature-controlled (but cooling and warming yourself in hot or cold environments respectively, helps burn calories; some think one cause of American obesity is our climate-controlled environments.)

Loop from Hyde Park

Loop from Hyde Park

Green Line approaches Chicago EL

Green Line approaches Chicago EL

Madison and Wabash Chicago EL stop

Madison and Wabash Chicago EL stop

Chicago EL stairs

Chicago EL stairs

Dr John Ellis MD

Board-certified anesthesiologist, with expertise in cardiovascular anesthesia and the implications of obesity and sleep apnea in anesthesia. See vascularanesthesia.com for professional information. Dr. Ellis has used the strategies in here to: (1) lose 120 lbs over 18 months, (2) stop all antihypertensive medicines, and (3) no longer need CPAP treatment for sleep apnea.