Addicted?

These days he is down to about 210 pounds, where he has kept it for 20 years.



Michael Prager … talks about his self-published book, “Fat Boy, Thin Man” (2010).

“And, after decades of gaining and losing the same 100 pounds, he finally shed his extra weight. It seems the pounds might be gone for good: The 5-foot-10 Prager has weighed about 210 pounds for the past 20 years.

I’ve not read the book, but an article about him the Washington Post focuses on the aspects of overeating that are like addiction.  Quotes from him and the article:

The notion of food addiction remains controversial, but there’s growing belief that it’s a real phenomenon, a stance that’s increasingly supported by science. Recent research found that people with a family history of alcoholism had increased risk of obesity, suggesting that both conditions might be driven by the same tendency toward addictive behavior. In fact, some experts think food addiction might be one of the prime causes of America’s obesity epidemic, especially as potentially addictive ingredients such as fat, sugar and salt have played a larger role in our nation’s diet.

I have found that planning meals and exercise out in advance, and eating healthy foods before I get too hungry, help keep me on track.

Dr John Ellis MD

Board-certified anesthesiologist, with expertise in cardiovascular anesthesia and the implications of obesity and sleep apnea in anesthesia. See vascularanesthesia.com for professional information. Dr. Ellis has used the strategies in here to: (1) lose 120 lbs over 18 months, (2) stop all antihypertensive medicines, and (3) no longer need CPAP treatment for sleep apnea.

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